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. >>> president obama promised to create a million manufacturing jobs in four year, but last month we actually lost manufacturing jobs. what happens to u.s. workers if america can't manufacture a renaissance? that's next. she's still the one for you - you know it even after all these years. but your erectile dysfunction - you know,that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess with cialis. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you
manufacturing jobs in four years but last month we actually lost manufacturing jobs. what happens to u.s. workers if america can't manufacture a renaissance? esigner ♪ ♪ sunglasses be foggin' ♪ this crowd is classic ♪ so we play 'em like rachmaninoff ♪ ♪ just hooked 'em up with score alerts ♪ ♪now we're about to set it off ♪set it off like a score alert ♪ beep beep what? ♪if you set your phone to vibrate ♪ ♪ then it might alert your button flies all the ♪ ♪ girls and the guys wanna keep that credit score ♪ ♪ high like a private jet free-credit-score-dot-com ♪ ♪ don't forget narrator: offer applies with enrollment in freecreditscore.com [ male announcer ] purpose elevates what we do. raises it to a more meaningful place. makes us live what we do, love what we do and fills our work with rewarding possibility. aarp connects you to a community of experienced workers and has tools to help you find what you're good at. an ally for real possibilities. aarp. go to aarp.org/possibilities. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global p
new businesses, but it's primary function is really help and support manufacturers and the manufacturing environment and if there is anything that you would like to add in relationship to that please free free, so janet lee from sf made provided some information on some of the stats for women in the san francisco's local manufacturing, so -- may i have the overhead at all? you may not be able to read this but 48% of the local manufacturers are women owned businesses. 53% are in a parallel. 54% are women in food and beverage -- 54% are in the food and beverage sector. and note that apparel and food and beverage are the largest sectors within sf made membership that comprise of women owned businesses. one of the issues they wanted to bring up and bring to both commission's attention is that they feel it's very relevant to women in manufacturing the lack of child care options both in terms of availability and affordability. especially there is a lack of child care approximate to the manufacturing businesses and it's not possible to put facilities in businesses th
.s. manufacturers thinking about pulling out? all that and more tonight on the "nightly business report" for this thursday, april the 18th. good evening, everybody, and welcome. i'm bill griffeth in this week for tyler mathisen. suzy, it's clear that technology is going to set the tone for tomorrow, don't you think? >> three big tech names in the news tonight, google, microsoft and ibm. three huge technology companies all reporting latest quarterly earnings after the bell tonight with mixed results. the results are important given new concerns about slowing global economic growth. and a sharp decline in the sales of personal computers this year. the report set up a flurry of activity in after-hours trading as the direction of all three companies will impact countless other tech suppliers and component makers on friday. and since ibm is the most heavily weighted stock in the dow, investors will keep close watch on big blue shares tomorrow. microsoft was the first of the big three to report this evening, and that's where we begin with seema mody at the nasdaq. seema? >> suzy, a big day fo
lost more than 18% of its values, closing at $19. >>> and coming up, a manufacturing renaissance? from the rust belt to the deep south, we're look agent the new face of manufacturing in america. >>> first, though, a check on how the international markets finished the day. >>> good news for drivers. aaa says its springtime gasoline prices haven't been this low in three years. right now prices at the pump are averaging $3.51 a gallon nationwide. that's down 13 cents during the month of april alone. and things may get even better this summer. aaa says gas prices could drop to as low as $3.20 a gallon by mid summer if current trends of lower crude oil prices, full production at refineries and weak demand continue. >>> lower energy costs helped consumers and businesses, but day we learned a key indicator of manufacturing in the midwest slumped to its lowest level since 2009. the chicago purchasing managers index of business activity contracted for the first time in three years. so is this a sign that american manufacturing may be slowing down, or just taking a spring-time pause? >> reporter
youngstown now in is manufacturing, three-dimensional printing, the cutting edge of manufacturing. the cutting edge of additive manufacturing, partnering with big companies like lockheed and boeing and other smaller companies, but public money from the department of defense, the department of energy, the department of commerce, public-private partnerships to help position america, not just our region, in the next generation of additive manufacturing, help drive the costs down for these printers so that everyone that has a desk top computer now can have a desk top printer that prints products. that could revolutionize health care, revolutionize energy, revolutionize manufacturing in the defense energy, but this is a public-private partnership. and what we cannot do is say, oh it's , it's public moneyy got to be bad. the investments we make for the poor in the medicaid program so that we can make sure that these kids have basic health care in the united states of america. and yes, we do need education reform. yes, we do need innovation within the health care system and we have a lon
0%, that is an incentive that has been bought down by a manufacturer. so it's 3.5%, 4%, but customers are used to paying 5%, 6%, 7% on the financing of an automobile. so i don't think the normalization of interest rates to those levels is going to unseat these drivers that i've called out that are driving this recovery. we're in the early innings of this automotive recovery. we're on a journey back to the industry, selling 16, 17 million units a year. >> that's nice to end on an upbeat note. thank you, mike. so good to see you. mike jackson, ceo of auto nation. >>> and sticking with the theme of retail a little later in the program, we'll look at why walmart is one earnings report to watch when that sector reports. >>> meantime, united health care beat earnings estimates. it wasn't all positive. the company also said first quarter profits dropped because of lower government payments for its medicare services. the company warned that the sequester would pressure profits the rest of this year, and it did not issue specific guidance for 2014. united health care was off al
manufacturing company here making real products. tied to being the center of innovation. and they do it in a way that is very innovative. and here we are in a neighborhood that is a bustling neighborhood of technology and biotech with ucsf up the street. it's a pleasure to be a san franciscans in this day and age. in terms of our project, we are very excited about the fact that anchor represents the first major tenant and the kick-start to our mission rock project. to us it's the perfect partnership. we have been around a while, 1958. but that pales in comparison to anchor. 1896. as keith mentioned they are long-time partners with the giants back to candlestick park days. and anchor plaza was launched in 2010. and we won that year. and so we are going with a team that helps us win baseball games as well. this project is interesting in that it's about 20% of the total square footage. 20% of the total size of the project and 5% of the total square footage of mission rock. it will serve in many ways as the front door to the mission rock project. people will see it as they come to games and the neig
-tech manufacturing and homegrown energy. put people back to work building new roads, bridges, and schools. to give workers the skills they need to do those jobs, we will invest in education that begins in the earliest years and job training that predicates workers to compete in the 21st century. to make sure that hard work is ladders, we will build of opportunity in the middle class and focus on revitalizing some of our communities hardest hit with the recession and job loss. all of these will help grow the economy and create jobs. none of them will add to the deficit. i will lay out priorities in greater details in the days ahead. the budget doesn't spend beyond our means and it does not make harsh, unnecessary cuts that only serve to slow the economy. we'll keep our promise to an we willpulation and keep our promise to the next generation by investing in the fundamentals that have made america strong -- manufacturing, innovation, energy, and education. that is what it will take to make sure america remains strong in the years ahead and to leave something better behind for our kids. thank you. ha
of the manufacturers we have here. let's start by looking at one right back here. this is a really interesting one because this has some of the characteristics of a traditional san francisco building. it has this starting with the board, i think it is called, and it has both old-fashioned kind of pictures and real modern stuff. what do you see here? >> looking around, it has gone a soaking tub. >> it has little jets in a, so like a spot/hydrotherapy kind of thing? >> exactly. what people need to be mindful on for these types of tubs are two things -- number one, they have a motor, and you have to have an access panel on it. you have to be mindful of that. you cannot just stick it in there and hide the motor forever. it has waterjets here. really popular in these tubs is soaps and oils, and the water recycles them. sometimes the shampoos and oils clogged the system. an alternative to that is air jets. air jets do not do that. it has a pedestal sink and a matching toilet. it has a wonderful medicine cabinet here with a great feature now, so there is actually a locking compartment so you can put your
of more than 6%. managers at manufacturing and nonmanufacturing firms forecast a decline in capital expenditure. executives at large firms across all industries expect capital spending will fall 2% on average. that will be the largest decline in four years. u.s. stock markets ended lower on monday as they followed negative sentiment stemming from lackluster data from the united states and china. the dow jones industrial average closed down less than a .1 of a percent. the nasdaq closed at 3,239 down just about .9 of a percent. to see how stocks in japan are trading let's go to ramin. good morning. a bit of hesitation in markets here in japan and the u.s. >> a couple of key events this week and the bank of japan policy board meets on wednesday. both could dictate where dollar/yen trades in the days to come. let's have a look at the opening levels for today. we're seeing both indexes trading lower considerably. the nikkei down 2.3% and the top topix down 2.5%. we're weaker than what many had expected. some of the marketplace also warning that if the bank of japan policy meeting fails
that's breaking just at the top of the hour. shedding the final march pmi manufacturing for europe coming in at 46.8. as you can see, the euro is roughly unchanged. some economies, the biggest ones have seen while they're still in contraction some improvement from the flash numbers two weeks ago. the euro is up about 0.1%. 1.28 is the level. markets perhaps don't have a worse tone keying off the session we had in the u.s. yesterday. let's dig into these figures a little bit and get a sense of just how we're starting the month off here. holger, i can run through some of these figures. we've got the pmi falling. it was 46. 6/. it was 46.8, just a touch better, but still, contractionary territory. >> it's basically fairly bad news what we had with the eurozone in terms of economic data. after a pretty good run which lasted until february, march has been a softer month. apparently the political volleys in italy and at the end plus some concerns about china seem to be weighing on sentiment going forward, at least, we learned yesterday from the chinese pmi, which has been up, these conce
that peer 70 is where we are going to make it happen with s f made manufacturing where the covenant we have four thrive companies manufacturing already -- in san francisco from the -- that i chocolates that i just presented to mayor khan to everything from wood shaw bags to do do case which are the upper covers to ceramic and is so many other thing being made here and assist in shipping out those products to the port of oakland to the rest of the world. we are creating for our local manufacturing companies a sense not only that they can manufacture here in a good business climate, and establish those plans here in san francisco at peer 70 and other places but that we will help them as a city to create international market. we are not just satisfactory with national markets, technological expects pharmaceutical company and is products and have the opportunity to work with me. san francisco has the highest concentration of counsel general office and is international embassy offices outside of new york and washington dc we will utilize the city relation to create international markets and th
of equipment, but fortunately, our friends, the largest manufacturer in the city and county of san francisco, want to occupy pier 48. and this rendering shows you how you could be in a restaurant in the front of the pier and look through the glass to see the house in the body of the pier and an elegant solution that we think is terrific. by the way the giants are the largest consumer of the product in the world. there is a connection between the organizations. >> the park we will go through this really quickly and there are a lot of components of the park and it is meant to attract a diverse array of people and you have places where you could enter the water with a kayak adjacent with pier 38 and we could accommodate in the park and in the middle and where you see the restaurant and the edge of the junior, giant's baseball field as more meant to appeal to family and children and it is meant to be a very active park space so that it feels comfortable at times and also a meandering walkway that brings in the water and provides great views and some porch wetlands for wild life and we will talk
will potentially put our credit rating at risk is manufactured crisis. >> we are manufacturing them every three month. >> he will not negotiate around the debt ceiling. >> thank you for your testimony to date. on want to talk about the president's proposal but on the question of the death and how we arrived at this moment in time am i correct or is it fair to say that the 2001 bush tax cut that was not paid for at the time by this congress come add to this country's debt burden? >> there were two wars that were not paid for and a prescription drug plan was not paid for. >> as a result of the collapse of the economy in 2008 we took a $22 trillion hit, by some object of estimates necessitating a substantial bailout by this congress by financial institutions and a similar package, both of which presumably also added to our debt burden. is that correct? as it relates to the forward-looking plan, that you articulated that 5 believe would total $4.3 trillion in deficit-reduction over the next, it does seem to be a forward-looking plan, my suggestion to the contrary, what very peculiar situation as it
manufacturing industry being destroyed at a time when the things are available for investment in manufacturing industry, and that is reflected now in a balance of payment deficits. when will the prime minister explain to the house and the british people when they will be in the black again? >> mr. speaker, when they have growth going too fast, inflation do higher manufacturing investment. that not only government will determine the prospects. it depends on how well businesses keep their costs down. the more the trade unions press for higher wage claims, regardless, regardless of think it is, i about time the opposition faced up to that instead of being on and complaining it will not become -- it will become non- competitive. ons is shown by their policy credit control. in today's open market, credit controls do not and could not work. see a lotus -- we all of advertising credit. recently was very interesting. i happen to have it with me. it says this. it says this. >> order. visa cards work just like every other visa credit cards. you can choose your own credibility. simply pick the relevant b
the manufacturing sector which has added half a million jobs over the last three years. in fact for the first time in more than a decade, the u.s. is actually outpacing other countries. our next guest says that's no fluke. cheaper u.s. energy prices here and higher shipping and labor costs in other markets have made the economics of outsourcing far less appealing. joining me from "time" magazine, she co-wrote this week's cover story. made in america. as we just mentioned, as you say, one of the reasons manufacturing is up is because u.s. factories are increasingly getting access to cheap energy. thanks to oil and gas from shale boom. is that an inconvenient truth for folks who might oppose something like key stone pipeline? >> well, it is a great question. absolutely more pipelines and not just from canada are probably going to have to be built if we're going to take advantage of the lower energy prices that we've already seen. so much shale has come online. there is a lot more to come. some folk are call for new pipelines to be built from the west. north dakota, places like that. to eastern facto
chip processing, the technology boom, home of the internet and also home of many advance manufacturing production sites. h.r. 1022, the securing energy critical elements and american jobs act of 2013, aims to help reduce our dependence on china for these critical elements. instead make it here in america. but in order for us to to this we need to invest in developing our technical work force here at home. currently the united states lacks the necessary technical expertise to ensure a reliable supply of energy critical elements. my bill, h.r. 1022 enlists the talents of our university students and encourages them to develop the technical expertise necessary to secure america's access to these elements. we need to ensure that the best and brightest minds in our area, in our country, have the tools and support they need to support america's access to energy critical elements. h.r. 1022 will promote collaboration and research opportunities in the field of energy and critical elements for students at higher institutions and coordination of federal agencies to promote a stable supply of ener
together. >> that is exactly what they do. where were they manufactured and where were they sold. they are very common everyday pieces. the key is when they get to these pieces, they get them into the laboratory. that is when they are going to find whether there is a simple little piece of dna oh a slice of scotch tape or fingerprint left over on a device that the bomber doesn't know they left behind. >> shep: we've scrolled through the pictures again. are these serial numbers on the pressure cooker is that what they are looking at when they zoom in? >> we are examining that to try to determine exactly what those numbers are. we talked to who we believe is the manufacturer, but we're still working on that. i think there is some underwriting laboratory numbers on there. there is some numbers that may be, as you say, serial numbers. the same thing the f.b.i. and atf, who manufactured this piece. they got enough to work with. they are going to be able to take that and find out who manufactured it, who sold it and where. >> shep: so dale, what you are saying, after the bomb exploded
space large enough for the kind of scale of manufacturing that we would like to do on that pier there and if that scale of manufacturing you think that those kinds of jobs are important to the city, and that we will be adding lots of kind of jobs to the city, you don't normally see in the cities and not all for lawyers and account ants. we could not have done this or got this far without the support of the giants. a part from it being the largest customer, they have shown a tremendous degree of leadership to us in terms of how to go through this very, very complicated process. and for us, as a small manufacturer, to do something like this on our own will be extremely difficult, and perhaps, just too much of a challenge. but everybody in here, today and everybody support, we really believe that this could be a phenomenal new attraction in the city. so i urge your support, thank you. >> thank you. >> next speaker? >> good evening, supervisors, kate (inaudible) the executive director of ss, made and i am here to lend my support to this project and i think that all of you know that
youtube. for those cats, 72 hours of video uploaded. and most of it seems to be cats. >>> manufacturing data from the exporting centers of asia in europe driving the markets. nina did he santos is in london. let's start with nina. >> thanks so much. markets, as you can see here, starting out a little bit of a mixed notes. the dax is actually down in the first hour and a half of trading. as you said, a lot of it has to do with, of course, concerns about the strength of europe's biggest economy, germany. let me just run into the purchasing manager's index, the pmi for the month of april. that came in at 47.9. i might point out that anything below 50 indicates a contraction for manufacturing, hence, the reason why people are quite so concerned. so the readings for germany came in at a four-month low. that's concerning because germany is supposed to be a locomotive of growth. it's managed to spirit off a recession. many are hoping this country will be able to drag the other troubled eurozone companies out of their predicament. the first time in five months there's strengthening. it's a simi
see the markings of a popular manufacturer or serial number of some sort. it appears to be the words "gas electric" but that's just our reading of it, obviously not a scientific analysis. it's twist and had bent but obviously the numbers are still visible. the fourth photo shows more twisted metal and what appears to be more numbers on the outside of the casing. the question is whether these numbers could be significant in determining the origination of this. while you would think the explosive device would have been destroyed in the blast, but obviously investigators have a lot of information here possibly to work with. now, in terms of where the device was stored, this is all that's left of a black bag. it's been described as a knapsack. it's been shredded, obviously no longer intact, but it will still be analyzed by the fbi and that's the bag they believe where the pressure cooker was stored. let me show you one more photo. this appears to be the remains of metal pellets, the ball bearings you've heard those people talk about. some of the tiny pellets look like they melted togethe
, nice to see both of you this morning. manufacturing jobs fell by 3,000 in march. president obama says he wants to create a million new manufacturing jobs in four years, you guys, but the manufacturing jobs of today require a skill set that's pretty high tech. rana you recently wrote "while all the technology will translate into higher end jobs it also means borrowing dramatic growth, fewer jobs overall especially in the middle. positions will either be high end or lower paid since swowork still have to compete with cheaper overseas labor." i'm so worried about losing the middle because that feeds into the income and equality, the standard of living and equality in america. >> absolutely. it goes back to the point 70% of our economy is about consumer spending. if you lose the middle it's hard to have a recovery. there have been a lot of hopes penned on manufacturing and i'm still relatively bullish that longer term american manufacturing can create more job growth. i think you do see a lot of interesting technological developments, you see companies line ge hiring software engineers, t
we ask for and we had a great presentation from the police department is what can the manufacturers do to make these items not marketable. no secondary market whatsoever. i remember the department reached out to apple, some of the carriers and asked them what can do you. i'm a little disappointed, our folks were told that they are working on a program to basically call brick the phones or make them obsolete so there is no reason why want to steal them if they have no market value. we learned that the phones when they are stolen they are immediately worth $300, and they are available for $500. for each one of those reports people get smacked to the face or knocked to the ground. we hope manufactures and carriers can do something, we were told they were working on it and we actually learned that in another country they already have those devices. so i was going to talk to the commission, we should schedule this for a follow up where we send a letter to the cellphone manufactures and carrier as a commission saying it's putting our public at risk and wonder if we can calendar that for
like to find some good value. > what about the manufacturing sector? we have china moving faster than anticipated, the u.s. slowing down just a tad. what do you see happening? will it matter to you? > > i think china sort of ebbs and flows in fits and starts. china all of a sudden one month is doing really well, and then the next month is doing really poorly. i think the new government regime there is a little bit more cautious in terms of just the overall wealth, in fact they are trying to dampen that down a bit, which i think is going to affect manufacturing. so i think the resurface of manufacturing here in the states will continue. it is great to see "made in the u.s.a." being stamped on a lot of things. and that should be an area of sustained growth. > thank you ed. > > thanks angie. coming up, car charge: will tesla shares accelerate from here? chart talk is next. i wanted to be in the military since i was a kid. i served in the united states air force. i served a total of 16 years. i was deployed 13 times. on my second deployment four bombs hit my vehicle. and at 19 years old,
. grossman associate, honolulu marketing distribution and consulting firm for medical manufacturers. owner 25 years. autism sie of hawaii president 3 years. autism society of america president and ceo 1 1/2 years and currently. lee grossman. born new jersey, wife, marie. 4 children. 53 years of age. republican. trenton state college va business. u.s. house of representatives new jersey fourth district including parts of ocean counties 26 years and currently. elected at 26 years of age. coalition for autism research and education. cochair with congress man mike doyle of pennsylvania. author of legislative acts autism statistics, surveillance, research and epidemiology. honors, several including autism society of america congressional hero award. christopher smith. >> before we leave the subject on whether or not vaccines cause autism, which is a commonly held view, there is a division particularly on the drug the mare sol. and it should be noted that in the november december issue of of the columbia journalism review, a very lengthy article addresses the journalistic responsibilities are of ho
their children. >>> the lawsuit claims many baby foods contain led. the manufacturer should be required to issue warning labels. >> reporter: some baby foods contain led and are potentially hazardous. >> these companies exposed children to led without a warning and what we are here to do is see if they have an excuse. >> the trial pitting the foundation against food manufacturers began today in court. among them gusher, del monty and beachnut -- gurber, del monty and beachnut. as febof this year -- as february of this year the fda said they don't pose any harm. the foundation is claiming under proposition 65 the manufacturers are required to post warning labels. the companies say they aren't because the led amounts are small and occur naturally. mothers had concern about baby food. >> they are not careful, i think they should not make baby food anymore. >> parents have a right to know and children have a right to be protected. >> reporter: the trial is expected to last four weeks. rob roth, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> a report shows students have different levels of access to computers in the clas
a some thing. and made in america, you will not believe what a new company is manufacturing now in detroit. >> all that and more coming up right here on "nightly business report" for wednesday april 10th. good evening everywhere, the stock market took off from the opening bell and it does not stop until the close. it's a rally that does not want to quit. it is hardly getting old for most investors. stocks sprinted to more records today. in a broad rally that pushed the dow and the s&p 500 to fresh all-time closing highs. the nasdaq for its part closed at its highest level in years. and traders were cheering, because of better than expected import data from china. the blue chip dow index surged 129 points closing at a record 14,802 with 14,000 dow in sight now. and the s&p was up 15 points, nearly 2%, fueled by sizeable gains in big tech companies and the s&p 500 index up 19 points. >> another factor fuelling the rally. some encouraging news from the federal reserve. the note from the fed's latest meeting show that most policy makers wants to continue to buy billions in bonds eve
nuances notwithstanding. and by the way, manufacturing not exactly strong for a while and that's heavily dependent on it, as it is still on-- you could make an argument that there is a pattern here, right? >> but i would make a different argument which is that those states had less manufacturing than the rust belt manufacturing states and so, they offer of opportunities-- >> now you're grabbing at straws. >> no, i'm not. >> neil: fair to say that those that do not have to deal with excessive union contracts and demands tend to do better than those that do not. and left unshackled, you can do well. >> it's actually pretty logical. if you're a big business and you're having to invest a billion dollars in a new plant, do you want a place where you're going to have workers that are on-- working with you, not going to strike all the time. >> looking at a lot of things, you look at tax structure, there's a lot. >> that plays a big role. >> the system. >> paying employees is the number one cost in most businesses. >> and the union number one-- right to work or not, that's the number one decisio
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,331 (some duplicates have been removed)